Tuition, Financial Aid, and Finances

Indiana University strives to offer affordable online programs and to provide the resources and support you need to navigate this part of your educational journey. Here you'll find information about financial aid and costs for IU’s online programs, as well as tools you can use to help you manage your finances.

Tuition and Fees

Indiana University strives to offer affordable online programs. Tuition and fees are assessed based on the number of credits that you take each term. So, your costs can vary from semester to semester. Costs can also vary based on your academic program, your residency status, and the specific courses that you take.

If you are an online student and you currently reside in Indiana, contact the bursar's office at the campus offering the course for more information about online course refund policies. If you are an online student and you currently reside in a state other than Indiana, you may be subject to state-specific refund policies. Contact iuosfs@iu.edu for more information.

Distance Education Fee

Indiana University charges a $30 per credit hour distance education fee for online courses. The fee supports:

  • Academic Program Development. Development and maintenance of online courses and programs, including market analysis, collaborative program development, instructional design, technical support, and quality assurance. This allows you to benefit from a high-quality curriculum.
  • Student Services. Admissions, financial aid, boarding, coaching, tutorial, and career services. This enhances your success and promotes student retention.
  • Compliance. Compliance with standards and regulations imposed by accreditors and federal and state laws. This allows you to benefit from academic integrity and best practices across the university.
  • Marketing and Recruitment. University-wide web portal to all Indiana University programs and classes. 24/7 customer service. Marketing promotions and outreach. Customer relationship management system. You benefit from the continued growth of online programs and services.

Individual campuses may also charge fees in order to support campus-specific efforts to ensure the success of students engaged in online education.

Financial Aid

Financial Aid for Undergraduate Students

Financing your education is a crucial part of your success as a student. As an undergraduate student, there are several different types of aid that you can explore.

Grants

Grants are funds awarded to students that don't require repayment. Eligibility is based on your FAFSA and Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Grants you may be eligible for include:

Scholarships

Scholarships are funds awarded to students that don't require repayment. Scholarships are available from a variety of different sources, including the University, academic departments, and private organizations. Eligibility, application requirements, and amounts vary widely. Your campus scholarship services office has information for you, but we encourage you to consider other sources as well. Online scholarship search engines can be a good place to start. Remember that scholarships are free money; never pay to apply for or receive a scholarship.

For more information about scholarships specific to your home campus, click on the appropriate link below:

Loans

Loans can be a valuable investment in your education. Undergraduates may be able to participate in the Federal Direct Loan or other Federal Loan programs. The amount of loan funding you can borrow through the Federal Direct Loan program varies based on your grade level and dependency status. Parents of dependent undergraduate students may be eligible to borrow additional loan funds for the student. Private loans from banks and other lenders may also be available to creditworthy borrowers (or those with creditworthy co-signers).

Employment

Working while in school can allow you to earn money to help pay your tuition and fees or other expenses. In some cases, employers may provide tuition assistance or reimbursement to employees pursuing additional training. Consider how you’ll balance the demands of work and school as you consider employment opportunities.

Financial Aid for Graduate Students

Financing your education is a crucial part of your success as a student. As a graduate student, there are several different types of aid that you can explore. The GradGrants Center (GGC) is a free service of the University Graduate School. It is open to currently enrolled graduate students within the Indiana University system.

Loans

Student loans are the most common resource available to graduate students. The government offers two different types of loans: the Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan and the credit-based Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan. Additional loan opportunities may exist based on your program of study or future career interests. Check with your graduate school on this option. Private loans from banks and other lenders may also be available to creditworthy borrowers (or those with creditworthy co-signers).

Scholarships

Scholarships are available from a variety of different sources, including the University, academic departments, professional organizations, and private agencies. Eligibility, applications, and amounts vary widely. Your campus scholarship services office has information for you, but we encourage you to consider other sources as well. Contact your graduate program for information about program-specific funds. Private online search engines are also helpful. Remember that scholarships are free money; never pay to apply for or receive a scholarship.

Assistantships and Fellowships

Graduate assistants and fellows work in areas of administration, research, or teaching. They gain practical experience in their field and may receive tuition remissions, stipends, salaries, or other benefits in exchange for their service. Check with your graduate program for more information about opportunities available through the University, your academic department, and professional organizations.

Employment

Wages or salary from employment can be an outstanding way to cover some costs. Many companies provide tuition assistance or reimbursement for employees pursuing relevant educational training. The demands of graduate studies are significant, so consider how you’ll balance work and school as you make employment decisions.

Money Management

There’s more to being a student than just tuition and fees. Indiana University has tools to help you evaluate and plan for your other expenses, develop your financial management skills, and make informed decisions about student borrowing. Click here for more.

More Information

Want to learn more about your options?

For general questions about the financial aid process or student financial services available through IU Online, contact iuosfs@iu.edu. For specific questions about your personal financial situation, visit our Campus Contact page and contact the campus offering your program.